Welcome Visitor
Mon, Aug 3, 2020
162 members
FRONT PAGE
COMMUNITY NEWS
OPINIONS/EDITORIALS
LIFESTYLES
SCHOOLS/EDUCATION
OBITUARIES
BUSINESS
SPORTS
PREP FOOTBALL
FRANKLIN FACTS
CHURCH NEWS
COMMUNITY CALENDAR
MOST POPULAR
SEARCH ARTICLES
PAST ISSUES
SITE MAP
JOIN THE FT WEB SITE
LOGIN
LOGOUT
WHO'S ONLINE
EDIT YOUR PROFILE
MAKE US YOUR HOME PAGE
Greater Franklin Co. Chamber of Commerce
Franklin County, North Carolina
Franklin County Schools
Franklin Co. Arts Council
Franklin County Boys & Girls Club
Franklin County Library
Franklin Co. Relay for Life
World Overcomers Bible College
Five County Mental Health Authority
Franklin Co. Democrats
Franklin Co. Republicans
Franklin Co. Parks and Recreation
Youngsville Parks & Recreation
Bunn Youth Recreational League
Louisburg College
Vance Granville College
Crosscreek Charter School
Guardian ad Litem Program
N.C. General Assembly
North Carolina Government
Safe Space, Inc.
National Whistlers Convention
SPORTS LINKS
YOUTH LINKS
Viewed in perspective, Duke's fine is meager

Last week it was announced that Duke Energy pled guilty to nine felonies and was fined $102 million.

That is a lot of money, but let's put it in perspective.

Duke Energy had a profit of over $2.7 billion in 2013. The fine amounts to about 3.7 percent of that.

If you are a hard working Franklin County resident making $40,000 a year, do you think you could plead guilty to nine felony counts and walk away with a fine of $1,480 and no jail time?

Besides that, the $1,480 would come out of your pocket (after taxes) and the mouths of your family.

Duke Energy gets its money from us -- its customers.

The citizens of North Carolina will end up paying the fine for transgressions committed against us.

How can Duke Energy get a deal that is so much better than the average Tar Heel could?

The answer may have something to do with deep pockets, (filled with our money), and political investments. Former Duke Energy executive, (and at that time stock holder), Pat McCrory was the victorious Republican candidate for Governor in 2012.

Duke Energy invested heavily in his campaign. Reports of direct contributions run as high as $300,000, with another over $750,000 donated to the Republican Governor's Association, which financially subsidized McCrory's candidacy.

Do you think if you committed nine felonies that endangered the lives of hundreds of thousands of North Carolinians you could avoid prison? I don't.

Many people, including some of our Supreme Court justices, subscribe to the theory that corporations are people.

Yet when they are guilty of felonies, normally nobody goes to jail. Until and unless we change our laws to incarcerate the top executives, directors and/or stockholders of corporations, the corporate culture will not change.

Currently, the offending corporations lower their cost of doing business and if necessary let a lower ranking employee do the time.

From a cash flow standpoint, corporations invest in amenable candidates, spending far less in campaign contributions than equitable fines and tax rates would cost, all while using their customers' money.

On another note:

When you write political op-eds, somewhere between one-third and half of the people are going to disagree with you.

They are also going to inspire some comments and letters to the editor. The disagreements are often humorous and illustrate a deficiency in reading comprehension to the point of reinforcing the message of the op-ed.

If you want to make your rebuttal credible, I'd suggest you commence by quoting accurately -- all you have to do is copy.


Printer-friendly format


Members Opinions:
May 21, 2015 at 12:05pm
Marciniak,

Is your arrogance the reason you were removed from your political post in the midst of a political campaign?

You actually had a decent column until you uttered your arrogant words.

A True Free Thinker
Bruce Allen
May 25, 2015 at 10:51am
"From a cash flow standpoint, corporations invest in amenable candidates, spending far less in campaign contributions than equitable fines and tax rates would cost, all while using their customers' money."
I think it is somewhat disingenuous to say Duke is "all the while using their customers' money". The money they (Duke) uses is monies received for a service they provide. When they receive it the money ceases to be the customers (as you alluded)and becomes Dukes' to do with as they see fit. Putting forth your opinion as you did might "get a rise" from some folks, which I am sure was your intent. It's not, however,
as your by-line purports, "Telling the Truth".



Powered by Bondware
News Publishing Software

The browser you are using is outdated!

You may not be getting all you can out of your browsing experience
and may be open to security risks!

Consider upgrading to the latest version of your browser or choose on below: